The Boreal forest holds more freshwater than anywhere else on the planet. With its huge carbon storage system, it cleans the air we breathe and regulates our climate. And there’s more: this massive forest, which stretches from the Pacific to the Atlantic, is home to one-third of North America’s songbirds and threatened species, like woodland caribou and wolverine.

Protect North America’s Boreal Forest

Bull moose © Wayne Sawchuk


Larger than the Brazilian rainforest, the Boreal forest is essential for preserving the rich variety of life that sustains all of us. It also cleans our air and water and helps to regulate our planet’s climate. So much of a forests’ world remains secret to us — we are still discovering plants deep in the trees that provide life-saving medicines. But we do know many things about our forests. For example, we know that the Boreal is a critical home for the woodland caribou, an iconic Canadian species that once roamed much of North America and is now on the verge of extirpation in many parts of Canada. It is also home to one-third of North America’s songbirds.

The Boreal forest is truly an amazing place. Preservation of this abundant, intact forest will not only protect us from accelerated climate change, but also protect a wide-range of biodiversity from ecological collapse.

Latest News

Putting in place the world's largest conservation opportunity in Canada's Boreal forest is challenging yet essential work
Caribou in Canada's Boreal forest are sensitive creatures, who are the first to let us know about the ecosystem's health.
Two years after the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement was signed, much remains to be protected

Learn more about Boreal

The Issue

Larger than the Brazilian rainforest, the Boreal Forest is essential for preserving the rich variety of life that sustains all of us

The Facts

Boreal houses one-quarter of the world's remaining original forests and over a million freshwater lakes; it's vital regulator of global climate

The Solutions

We've signed onto the largest conservation initiative in history: the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement