Todd Paglia

Executive Director

When Todd Paglia joined ForestEthics in 1999, he had a vision of transforming the environmental impact of something so ubiquitous that it’s often forgotten – paper. He saw that major corporations in the office supply and catalog industries were purchasing and selling millions of tons of paper—with no accountability for, or even knowledge of, the environmental devastation caused by that paper.

As executive director of ForestEthics, Mr. Paglia can be credited with transforming the paper policies of multi-billion-dollar Fortune 500 companies, including Staples, Office Depot, Williams-Sonoma, Dell, Victoria’s Secret, and many more. In terms of forest protection, the results have been inspiring. Under Mr. Paglia’s leadership, ForestEthics has saved more than 65 million acres of endangered forests. In addition, recycled pulp mills are operating at record-high capacity—and independent analysis has attributed the change directly to demand from companies that ForestEthics has transformed. 


Mr. Paglia’s work at ForestEthics has been recognized with his selection to the annual “Hot 20 Under 40” list published by 7x7 Magazine, San Francisco’s glamour and culture publication.  Mr. Paglia was the only environmental leader selected, as the article noted, because “few activists have succeeded in the practical business of hitting earth abusers where it really hurts—their wallets.”  Mr. Paglia was also chosen as one of Ethisphere magazine’s one hundred most influential people in business ethics.

Mr. Paglia has challenged some of the largest companies in the world to become environmental leaders on the Today Show, NPR’s Marketplace as well in stories in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Time Magazine, Business Week, and many other publications. In March 2007, Mr. Paglia was a featured speaker at San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club, the nation’s oldest and largest public affairs forum.
Before joining ForestEthics in 1999, Mr. Paglia was an attorney for Ralph Nader focusing on consumer protection issues such as environmental purchasing by governmental agencies to spur alternative markets, enforcement of antitrust laws, corporate welfare issues and corporate accountability.
 
Mr. Paglia received his Bachelor of Arts from Binghamton University, SUNY, his J.D. from the New England School of Law, and his LL.M. from George Washington University, National Law Center, in Environmental Law and Policy.

He lives in Bellingham, Washington, with his wife Shannon and two young sons, Nico and Luca.

More content by this author:

Jun 18, 2015

On his way to Paris to meet with world leaders, Pope Francis joins a long list of faith leaders from all denominations who have taken a public stand on climate disruption and the transformation of our energy economy.

May 1, 2015

Secretary Foxx and President Obama have chosen to roll the dice instead of writing strong rules that protect the 25 million of us living in the blast zone. ForestEthics responds to new safety regulations.

Mar 17, 2015

Like the auto industry resisting seatbelts, the rail industry is on the wrong track when it comes to safety. What you should know about oil trains that industry lobbyist's don't want you to know.

Dec 12, 2014

A message from Executive Director, Todd Paglia, on how white Americans can engage in the fight against racial injustice.

Jul 1, 2014

Meet BEN, a program that trains activists and community leaders to challenge corporate policies and attitudes on social justice and environmental protection. Sounds familiar, right? We thought so, too.

Dec 30, 2013

Op-ed by executive director, Todd Paglia, in the Seattle Times

Aug 27, 2013

Our Executive Director, Todd Paglia, on why people in the US should care about changes to Canada's environmental laws

May 21, 2013

From our Executive Director, Todd Paglia: "Creating a win-win between logging companies and environmentalists isn’t easy-–but we have done it. Many Times."

Apr 22, 2013

Sustainable Forestry Initiative's lawyers demanded that ForestEthics “cease and desist” from calling out SFI

Apr 3, 2013

What's the central lesson of the Sacred Headwaters? Huge companies are powerful - but a united people are far more mighty

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